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Here’s the recipe for bracciole, let me say up front that I cannot take any credit for the recipe, it is my mom’s and my grandma’s recipe. I am merely proud that I am able to continue the tradition.


Makes 6

  • 6 pieces of bracciole meat (for those of you that are local to me Wallingford Locker has great bracciole meat)
  • 12 slices of bacon
  • 1 cup raisins divided into six portions
  • 6 pieces of garlic finely chopped
  • grated cheese of your choice (I use asiago or romano)
  • salt and pepper to taste
  • butcher’s twine cut into six pieces each cut about 2 feet in length
  1. Take meat and season with salt and pepper.IMG_5565
  2. Place two slices of bacon on each piece of bracciole
  3. Sprinkle with grated cheese of your choiceIMG_5557
  4. Add one portion of raisins sprinkled on top
  5. Add one chopped clove of garlic to each piece of meat.IMG_5566
  6. Roll each piece up. I find that it is easiest to roll up starting from the smaller or thinner end. If any of the raisins or cheese fall out as you are rolling, just stick them back inside.IMG_5561
  7. When meat is rolled, tie each with a piece of butcher’s twine.
  8. Place in tomato sauce of your choice and cook on low heat for 3-4 hours. You could probably put them into a slow cooker with your sauce and cook for 6-8 hours although I have not tried this myself.
  9. When ready to serve, remove each bracciole packet from sauce, cut the twine off (this is important, no one likes string in their dinner!), slice each with a sharp knife into four pieces and serve.
  10. Enjoy!

Poor Tom, it wasn’t much of a Father’s Day. We drove kids around, which wasn’t too bad, since we knew we were doing that and we were prepared for it and looking forward to have a few hours to ourselves after we delivered a group of kids to UVM in Burlington.

In between driving kids around, we came home to find that the dog had eaten a loaf of cinnamon raisin bread less the two slices that Tom and Tim had for breakfast. This was not good, especially on top of the two breakfasts that she got. Raisins are toxic to dogs, much like grapes, except since raisins are dried and concentrated, it takes a whole lot less raisins to reach toxic levels. We realized this when we were in Burlington and raced home to see 1)if we still had a dog; and 2) to get her to the vet.

Lo and behold, two days in doggy hospital, a whole lot of intravenous fluids and she is home. It was a very anxiety provoking Father’s Day and a very, very expensive loaf of raisin bread.


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