{{fr|Mort de César}} {{de|Der Mord an Gaius Iu...
Image via Wikipedia

“Beware the Ides of March” – a most famous line of literature taken from William Shakespeare’s Julius Caesar. It recounts the warning given by the seer to Julius Caesar, warning him. The Roman Emperor was murdered on March 15 in the year 44 B.C.

Soothsayer
Caesar!

CAESAR
Ha! who calls?

CASCA
Bid every noise be still: peace yet again!

CAESAR
Who is it in the press that calls on me?
I hear a tongue, shriller than all the music,
Cry ‘Caesar!’ Speak; Caesar is turn’d to hear.

Soothsayer
Beware the ides of March.

CAESAR
What man is that?

BRUTUS
A soothsayer bids you beware the ides of March.

CAESAR
Set him before me; let me see his face.

CASSIUS
Fellow, come from the throng; look upon Caesar.

CAESAR
What say’st thou to me now? speak once again.

Soothsayer
Beware the ides of March.

CAESAR
He is a dreamer; let us leave him: pass.

Shakespeare, Julius Caesar Act I, Scene II

“Ides” is a Latin word for “middle” and refers to the 15th of the months of March, May, July and October. In the other months, Ides is the 13th of the month. The Ides of March is celebrated every year in Rome by a Toga Run through the streets of Rome, where Julius Caesar was killed. Julius Caesar’s assasins, Brutus and Cassius. Both later take their own lives…..guilt?

Reblog this post [with Zemanta]
Advertisements